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mvwmvw
My daughter should be on 155s, but I have 135s, 140s and 166. She has a 24" inseam. She's 6 going on 7. Gear ratio 38/17. SHe has one more win as a novice to move up, but she's all but guaranteed to move up, which means usually racing against intermediate boys.

Do I run the 140s or the 166s? She's been choppy on the 166s, but only when she's tired. She can also go up a bit in gear ratio, too, as she spins out on most tracks this season. So maybe I try the gear ratio change first, then see what's what.

Thoughts?
Stromania
My son is 7 going on 8 in a few weeks and he's on 140mm cranks. I'd say stick with the 140's. I'm not a fan of the the crank length charts for kids. The crank length for the inseam seems to be bit long on those charts.
mxmug
QUOTE (mvwmvw @ May 19 2014, 05:30 AM) *
My daughter should be on 155s, but I have 135s, 140s and 166. She has a 24" inseam. She's 6 going on 7. Gear ratio 38/17. SHe has one more win as a novice to move up, but she's all but guaranteed to move up, which means usually racing against intermediate boys.

Do I run the 140s or the 166s? She's been choppy on the 166s, but only when she's tired. She can also go up a bit in gear ratio, too, as she spins out on most tracks this season. So maybe I try the gear ratio change first, then see what's what.

Thoughts?

How is she performing in the first straight compared to her competition;
1. Before the first jump?
2. Between first and second jump?
3. After the second jump going into the first turn?

If the above answers indicated a crank/gear change was in order, doing it now before she moves up would be a good idea. After a change the rider will usually be a bit slower as they adjust to the new set up. It would be better for her to work thru the adjustment period before moving up.
donmoore
Are you sure on the inseam measurement? 24" seems a little long for a soon to be 7 year-old girl. You should have her stand without shoes with her back to the wall and stick a book or something between her legs and move it all the way up.
chuckactor
That is some pretty short gearing. I can't really remember what my kids started on but 44-45inch gearing seems way off. My kids are pretty small for their age but my 10i is on 155's and my 9i is running 145 cranks. Both have gearing around 53-54inches.
mvwmvw
I looked at my initial post and realized a typo: 38/16 is what she is on. I am planning on doing some time trials on the 38/15 for her this week. If she races Weds night, she will be running the 38/15. She can really spin, ride the rollers and spent all last season on 135s, so I was thinking maybe the 140s might be good to smooth out her pedal stroke again. A 20mm jump is huge. I'm within a 1/2" on the measurement.

Against the novices, she tends to be first or tied to the first jump, first to the second, and first into the corner. That's for the last bunch of motos and mains... from late summer last year and the first few races this year. In the opens against experts and faster inters she's usually second or third to the first jump, but trails from there. She seems to spin out on faster tracks going into the rhythm section, and where a lot of the other kids her age will pedal and pump, she's only able to get pumps in. When the tracks are longer, her feet are moving but she loses ground if she's had a big lead, and it's not that the energy seems to be sapping.

Her technique is still maturing, I mean she's only close to 7, but before the longer cranks and when she was weaker she would be able to sneak in a pedal here on the more spaced sections. She is just beginning to learn to pull and pre-jump a bit, for whatever that is worth.

thebondtrader55
QUOTE (mvwmvw @ May 19 2014, 03:44 PM) *
I looked at my initial post and realized a typo: 38/16 is what she is on. I am planning on doing some time trials on the 38/15 for her this week. If she races Weds night, she will be running the 38/15. She can really spin, ride the rollers and spent all last season on 135s, so I was thinking maybe the 140s might be good to smooth out her pedal stroke again. A 20mm jump is huge. I'm within a 1/2" on the measurement.

Against the novices, she tends to be first or tied to the first jump, first to the second, and first into the corner. That's for the last bunch of motos and mains... from late summer last year and the first few races this year. In the opens against experts and faster inters she's usually second or third to the first jump, but trails from there. She seems to spin out on faster tracks going into the rhythm section, and where a lot of the other kids her age will pedal and pump, she's only able to get pumps in. When the tracks are longer, her feet are moving but she loses ground if she's had a big lead, and it's not that the energy seems to be sapping.

Her technique is still maturing, I mean she's only close to 7, but before the longer cranks and when she was weaker she would be able to sneak in a pedal here on the more spaced sections. She is just beginning to learn to pull and pre-jump a bit, for whatever that is worth.


"ride the rollers" -one of the best things you can ever do. The best purchase I ever made!

Before ya waste a bunch of time and money get someone that knows to observe her and tell you what he/she thinks.

Shes a spinner or a masher but I can promise you that she ain't both. Very little can be done constructively until you determine this.

Good Luck and enjoy this time in the sport!
donmoore
I would definitely give 38/15 a try, which if she is on 1 1/8 tires is still under a 51" rollout and considered on the low side for a girl. If she really has a 22" inseam than 140 should be better than 135. Don't feel bad about having her on low gearing and small cranks at her age. If she is able to compete successfully with 135 cranks and and a 47.5 inch rollout (38/15) than as you can go up a little in rollout and cranks, she should do very well. I would probably let her win out in novice with the 140's and 38/15 and then go up a little as an intermediate. You probably want to get some 150's or 145 soon, because 166 is too long. 166 are more for kids on expert size frames.

Your right on in your view of rhythm section and gearing for small kids. A very low gear makes it hard for the kid to get a pedal in here and there in the section. Its a trade off. You want them to develop where they can pump while pedaling or at least make it toward the top of bump before having to stop pedaling, but the lower gear also develops spin.

One thing I see a lot of people missing is how important pedaling technique is for these young riders. It seems people have forget how important things like Q-factor and crank length which develops proper spinning technique is. One large pet peeve I have is all the manufacturers now making outboard bearing for little kid cranks. If you have ever studied Q-factor you know outboard bearings are a very bad idea for small kids with short legs. I have tried to tell a few parents this at our local track and their response was, will my kid is improving nicely with them so I won't worry about it unless they quit improving. This is such a stupid line of thought, because you can put a novice on about any setup and because they are new to the sport they will improve, but once they develop poor pedaling techniques, like legs too wide from using outboard bearing cranks and chopping from too long of cranks, those bad habits are difficult to overcome and will slow their advancement when they reach expert or girl. I commend all the bmx companies who refuse to follow the outboard bearing fad for small kids!
mvwmvw
QUOTE (donmoore @ May 20 2014, 09:26 AM) *
One thing I see a lot of people missing is how important pedaling technique is for these young riders.

Totally agreed. I came to BMX through her at 4, but I raced road and mountain and know the importance of a smooth spin. I've spent more time on rollers in my life than I care to think about...

I wish I had some good pedaling technique drills that just seemed like play. She has a tendency to let the pedal end up in the middle of her foot, even when spinning, and it's so inefficient. She's been told otherwise by everyone, but it still happens. I'm thinking of putting her in clipless pedals just around the neighborhood so she gets used to having the ball of her foot on the platform more.

So I put her on the 140s, which had a 42t ring (Answer hand-me-down) and bumped the rear to a 17. We're going to try that out this weekend just riding around and riding the track.

Thanks for all your help, all!
Jason Chang
And changing a gear and then saying they are not a spinner after two races is not a true test. Spinning like other skills is developed through practice. It is not just automatic.
thebondtrader55
QUOTE (Jason Chang @ May 21 2014, 02:10 PM) *
And changing a gear and then saying they are not a spinner after two races is not a true test. Spinning like other skills is developed through practice. It is not just automatic.

Yes, it is.

Its completely automatic for a real spinner.

Spinning is not a skill. Its a God given ability.

Yet again and for the millionth time on this site we run up against the myth of teaching natural speed and, by extension, "fast feet."

As Ive written many times in the past - if anyone here can turn a masher into a spinner then the NFL, MLB, and the NBA are awaiting your call.

And so it goes......................................


donmoore
I think Jason’s statement is totally true. Bicycling is not running. You can’t line a bunch of kids up on the gate of a bmx track and have them ride a lap and pick out the spinners, because they will all be on different gears. You could never tell if a kid has natural foot speed if he/she is on a 58” rollout, because it’s not mathematically possible for them to reach a high rpm on a bmx track with this gearing. If you dropped their gearing, as Jason said, and gave them two races, you probably still couldn’t tell, because there is a total retraining before they can effectively use a major different gear.

Plus we are not talking picking people who may have the body and natural talent to run 40 yard in under 4.5 seconds. We talking about making a significant different in power (power = force x rpm) which can effect a bmx race since the most determining portion of the race is the gate and first straight. Increase the rpm by 15 without losing force and you significantly increased the power.

If the best bicyclist in history was able to go from a masher to spinner between his first and next 6 Tour De France wins (not a spin that would beat a Mark Cavendish in a sprint, but a spin that was still very significant in his future dominance of the GC) then a kid with only a few years of cycling can relearn their pedaling technique to make them faster.

The best cyclists, be it Road, MTB, Track, or BMX spend their entire careers on trying to improve their pedaling technique. People are not born with the ability to get all the power and efficiency that is possible out of spinning their feet in circles. It takes training and experimenting with amble time before conclusions can be drawn. Well that's my view and vote on the subject anyway.
thebondtrader55
QUOTE (donmoore @ May 21 2014, 09:02 PM) *
I think Jason’s statement is totally true. Bicycling is not running. You can’t line a bunch of kids up on the gate of a bmx track and have them ride a lap and pick out the spinners, because they will all be on different gears. You could never tell if a kid has natural foot speed if he/she is on a 58” rollout, because it’s not mathematically possible for them to reach a high rpm on a bmx track with this gearing. If you dropped their gearing, as Jason said, and gave them two races, you probably still couldn’t tell, because there is a total retraining before they can effectively use a major different gear.

Plus we are not talking picking people who may have the body and natural talent to run 40 yard in under 4.5 seconds. We talking about making a significant different in power (power = force x rpm) which can effect a bmx race since the most determining portion of the race is the gate and first straight. Increase the rpm by 15 without losing force and you significantly increased the power.

If the best bicyclist in history was able to go from a masher to spinner between his first and next 6 Tour De France wins (not a spin that would beat a Mark Cavendish in a sprint, but a spin that was still very significant in his future dominance of the GC) then a kid with only a few years of cycling can relearn their pedaling technique to make them faster.

The best cyclists, be it Road, MTB, Track, or BMX spend their entire careers on trying to improve their pedaling technique. People are not born with the ability to get all the power and efficiency that is possible out of spinning their feet in circles. It takes training and experimenting with amble time before conclusions can be drawn. Well that's my view and vote on the subject anyway.


And the myth continues through another generation.................
mxmug
Is it possible to really say both sides are correct?


Earlier it was mentioned that a crank gear combo was going to be riden and timed. Then said gear would be changed and another timed lap would be run.
This is an exercise in futility as the rider will no doubt perform best on the combo their currently adapted to. It does take time to adapt to a new gear/crank /frame, etc. Most riders that make a change start out slower until they they get used to the new set up. Even after acclimation the final difference is subtle, but with patience, improvements can happen. With out patience and understanding you'll end up more disappointed than anything else.

To speak to 007s point;
It's quite frustrating to have raced a guy when I was growing up who ran a 43/16. I ran a 45 or 46/16. Though I was both more fit and stronger, he could accelerate quicker and had a higher top speed.

The Babe Ruth of BMX, who has 5 national #1 titles and 2 world championships, often raced a 42/16. In his prime he frequently got the holeshot and was rarely passed afterward on any type of track.

Why? I would suggest both of the above riders had a much higher than normal percentage of type 2 a and type 2 b muscle fibers. At the highest level genetics play a major role. For the rest of us, let's just go have fun riding our bikes.
mvwmvw
Pretty funny the way that this conversation has evolved!

Spinning is a learned skill. EFFECTIVE and whether "one size fits all" spinning or mashing is "faster" is a totally different issue. So is the periodization of training, prior skills, etc. Even when "spinning" (80-110 rpm) there is a HUGE range. Rollers teach people to spin more effectively--ie get the most out of the entire pedal stroke with both feet and not stress any muscles beyond reason.

The person I was asking for is an almost-7 year old girl, tall and skinny, who has needed the turnover and needs an easy gear to get the hop at the gate. I don't want to mess with that, but I also don't want to hear, "I couldn't pedal any faster" when I'm seeing her little feet flying around. She's raced three times this year on the 166 cranks and she can make em move, but they seemed long. That is why I asked. Last year, and even on the rollers this winter (a couple times a week, for 1-2 min intervals) , she was riding 135s on a mini and had a very smooth pedal stroke even with her feet misaligned on the pedals in a race situation. I'm trying to make sure that any component choices I make for her don't mess with what pedaling skill she has developed. Being a masher and being choppy are two very different things.

I wasn't saying that I was going to just change the gearing and run one or two laps, but establishing a baseline and then going from there is a far more scientific manner of figuring what works and what doesn't. I'm talking at least a day on the new set up, on a track she knows, where the other variables are mitigated. Flat land sprints from a gate or standstill would work, too.
blueno2
If in doubt, stay with the shorter cranks. Having cranks too long will hurt worse than cranks that are too short.

thebondtrader55
QUOTE (mvwmvw @ May 22 2014, 10:29 AM) *
Pretty funny the way that this conversation has evolved!

Spinning is a learned skill. EFFECTIVE and whether "one size fits all" spinning or mashing is "faster" is a totally different issue. So is the periodization of training, prior skills, etc. Even when "spinning" (80-110 rpm) there is a HUGE range. Rollers teach people to spin more effectively--ie get the most out of the entire pedal stroke with both feet and not stress any muscles beyond reason.

The person I was asking for is an almost-7 year old girl, tall and skinny, who has needed the turnover and needs an easy gear to get the hop at the gate. I don't want to mess with that, but I also don't want to hear, "I couldn't pedal any faster" when I'm seeing her little feet flying around. She's raced three times this year on the 166 cranks and she can make em move, but they seemed long. That is why I asked. Last year, and even on the rollers this winter (a couple times a week, for 1-2 min intervals) , she was riding 135s on a mini and had a very smooth pedal stroke even with her feet misaligned on the pedals in a race situation. I'm trying to make sure that any component choices I make for her don't mess with what pedaling skill she has developed. Being a masher and being choppy are two very different things.

I wasn't saying that I was going to just change the gearing and run one or two laps, but establishing a baseline and then going from there is a far more scientific manner of figuring what works and what doesn't. I'm talking at least a day on the new set up, on a track she knows, where the other variables are mitigated. Flat land sprints from a gate or standstill would work, too.

Spinning is not a learned skill.
donmoore
mvwmvw,
Good reasoning. Listen to everyone’s opinion and evaluate it with the knowledge they have behind, but in the end, it’s your choice. No one, regardless what their knowledge is and how much desire they claim, will have as much knowledge as you about your kid or your desire. When a bmx instructor tells you to sit on the side line so he can communicate with your kid uninterrupted, then don’t ever give them another $, because they don’t understand who your kid’s real trainer, instructor, and encourager is. When they invite you out on the track and tell you the things to work on with your kid, after the lesson is over, then those are the ones worth paying money too.

One of the best sources of info I have found is the staging area of nationals. Most dads and moms, even though they can be a little guarded at times, have a desire to share what worked for them. When your girl graduates to the girl class I encourage you to do a few nationals, even if you have no desire for her to obtain a NAG number. The experience and knowledge learned is great stuff. And don’t be afraid of talking to parents who kids are NAG or doing well at the races, because they are just parents of little girls too.

Having fun it what’s it’s all about it and one way which usually works to increase the fun is to increase the performance. This genetic born to succeed stuff is pretty worthless when evaluating 6 & 7 year old kids. Most of the best athletes in the world were not known for their athletic ability at this age. Two of America’s best all time women sprinters had to wear leg braces from birth defects in their childhood. Their parents just hoped they would grow up to walk without braces and maybe without a limp. Who could say these ladies were born with foot speed?

My daughter and I were looking at BMX race videos on youtube and found Caroline Buchanan at the Worlds at age 8. I very much doubt anyone watching the race or video would have been able to predict she would one day be the World Champion at the Pro level, but as my wife pointed out, she had a great smile and attitude. Maybe that’s a better indicator of future success than an 8 year old’s performance.
thebondtrader55
Look, if all you're wanting to do is have fun then have fun. My whole philosophy of what BMX needs is that we have to get average kids in the sport on average tracks that just want to have fun. If that's what ya want then skill or genetic superiority don't mean a darn thing. They really don't.

But I don't think that's where you're at. I think you know what NAG is and I think you're serious about it. If ya weren't you wouldn't be asking the questions you're asking. They're too detailed for that. I think I sense the fever!

If I'm right you're not interested in women with leg braces or 2 others out of millions that actually were successful. This what we call statistically insignificant. Someone is gonna throw a spear up in the air somewhere on the planet this week and strike oil - but do you what that means? NADA, NOTHING, WHO CARES? - that's what that means. It has as much significance as a 2000 lbs Unicorn flying around with sparkle trailing along behind.

I asked a few Dads who have a ton of experience with NAG and full factory sponsorships back when they actually mattered about this very question. Between these kids (two boys/ one girl) there are roughly 11 NAG Number 1's and about the same number of Grands wins. As I said before completely factory sponsored back when it meant racing for free. Everything paid for but that meant that you had to be bullets - practically unbeatable. One of the kids (girl) is my brothers daughter.

I asked them what to look for if ya want to race and be a strong NAG contender. Here's what they said first.

1. If ya wanta be a Nag rider ya have to find out whether or not ya got fast feet. If ya don't have fun but forget NAG. You're just too far behind a real spinner when ya start.

2. You better find out if you're a real spinner and not just a blown up masher. You can train skill but ya can't train natural speed. If the non natural spinner and the real spinner both work the same the true spinner wins every time if he/she doesn't fall down. It's a complete sprinter sport at the high levels.

3. You better figure out whether or not you can move those pedals in circles fast enough to do it.

IMO, every NAG 1 in the history of BMX has been a true spinner with fast feet.

Now that's statistically significant!

God help me, If I hear "you can be anything you want to be" again I may have a coronary and someone else will have to step in and finish this stock transaction I'm working on. Or break out into a mad chorus of KHUMBAYA!!!

1. If you have no math skills you cant be an engineer!

2. If you cant do research and process information you cant be a lawyer.

3. If you have shaky hands and a low attention span you cant be a welder on high value projects.

4. And if you dont have the ability to spin you can't be a top National quality BMX rider. Unless everybody else routinely falls down.

Here's a plan :

1. Find out what your talents are.

2.Do everything you can to enhance those talents to the utmost.

3. Be satisfied with where you arrive if you meet your goals.

4. And here's one where we all agree - have fun!

As I've written many times, I am muchhhhh moreeeee interested in average kids than I am in NAGS and other genetic marvels. There just ain't enough "marvels" around to make any difference in what I want to do with BMX bicycle racing.

But please, please, please don't be fooled by anyone who tells you that we're gonna teach you to spin. When you hear this walk away as quickly as decent decorum will allow. Can you improve ? Yes. Will you be a true spinner when you're finished? Never.

And remember this phrase - Does Air Exist?

It's saved me a ton of money over the years.

Good Luck - and I sincerely mean that. Its part of the reason I took time out of a another 80 hour work week to write this. I hope you don't have to waste the time and money that sooooo many have had to.

Have Fun!
mxmug
In my experience one race day on a gear after having raised or lowered the front chainring no more than one tooth would be the minimum time I would use to evaluate.

donmoore
QUOTE (thebondtrader55 @ May 22 2014, 05:13 PM) *
IMO, every NAG 1 in the history of BMX has been a true spinner with fast feet.

Now that's statistically significant!

Word of advice, use words like "most" instead of "every". http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oMbxnr7T6kw Vallen Tupper, 2012 Grands 8 Girls on a 40-14, 57 inch rollout! Her third Grands win and NAG title in a row, all on high rollouts.

I don't want to name names, because I might get it wrong, but I have heard their is a women pro in the top five this year currently using a mid 50" rollout.

PS The old days you were referring too, when riders had full factory rides, weren't they back when the bikes they raced were similar to the ones the kids used on the streets with high seats and flat pedals, hence a manufacturer could expect to sell a lot of bikes if they sponsored a winning bmx racers? Bikes, tracks, riders, and techniques have changed since then. Maybe foot speed is still a big factor, but not quite the factor it was when the down stroke was the only power they could apply to make the bike go faster.
thebondtrader55
Lunch!

Look guys, I have had hundreds of people ask me over the years where I would put money right now. God I hate that! But I finally came up with the perfect answer. Its really simple actually - I just give them the same list of investments that I have my own children in. Done. What they do with the info after that is up to them.

So that's what I did here. I told you all the truth based on my experience and backed by absolutely outstanding results. That's all.

One of the recommendations listed was to talk to NAG riders and their relatives in the staging lanes. Well, you just talked to one. There is not one thing that can be won in BMX bicycle racing (except the O's and the only reason one of the 3 kids didn't win that is that he can't live on what it pays) that the three kids listed didn't win multiple times. Everyone of them, and everyone of the elite kids on the teams they rode for, had the same characteristics. Every one.

Guys, I have no dog in this fight. I am not selling anything. It doesn't mean anything to me where anyone in BMX finishes in a race. But this whole thing is putting me in the same position that I am often in with Elvis about growing the sport. The only way I can make E happy is to lie to him. That's the only way.

Hers the truth. If I was kidnapped by some nefarious force who had stolen all my assets and threatened me with death if I didn't produce a NAG 5 rider within 12 months the very first thing I would do is find a kid with fast feet. IMO, based on what I've personally witnessed, if I don't do this I'm gonna die! And even worse, die broke! BRRRR!

What anyone does with the info is, of course, up to them.

Hope everyone has a wonderful Holiday!

mxmug
Many threads this one included are started to ask a question. In the sub heading, people need to indicate what answer they want so that they will not be offended by a truthful answer that happens to be contrary to their opinion.

If you don't want an answer, don't ask a question!
donmoore
"My daughter should be on 155s, but I have 135s, 140s and 166. She has a 24" inseam. She's 6 going on 7. Gear ratio 38/17. SHe has one more win as a novice to move up, but she's all but guaranteed to move up, which means usually racing against intermediate boys.

Do I run the 140s or the 166s? She's been choppy on the 166s, but only when she's tired. She can also go up a bit in gear ratio, too, as she spins out on most tracks this season. So maybe I try the gear ratio change first, then see what's what.

Thoughts?"

Hey, this question is about as straight forward and honest as they come. A true question from a Dad with a 6 year old novice, soon to be advancing to the girl class, asking for advice on crank length and gearing. If there is any problem with this thread its all of us with some years of experience twisting our answers to emphases our own agenda which hardly relates to the dad's question.
mxmug

Small changes, lots of evaluation time.
Go one size up in crank
One tooth up in gear
Do it immediately before she moves up
She will probably be slower initially
It takes time for the body to learn a new set up
Before making the switch pay close attention to how she is doing in each third of the first straight
Begin a race log so you don't forget
After switching gear/crank continue to take notes on how she's doing realitive to her comp in the 3 parts of the first straight
1 race day minimum to evaluate her performance.
thebondtrader55
QUOTE (mxmug @ May 23 2014, 09:58 PM) *
Small changes, lots of evaluation time.
Go one size up in crank
One tooth up in gear
Do it immediately before she moves up
She will probably be slower initially
It takes time for the body to learn a new set up
Before making the switch pay close attention to how she is doing in each third of the first straight
Begin a race log so you don't forget
After switching gear/crank continue to take notes on how she's doing realitive to her comp in the 3 parts of the first straight
1 race day minimum to evaluate her performance.

M, I really like what you've posted here.

Start somewhere below where you the the sweet spot is and slowlyyyyy work your way up.

Even after the determination is made about the "spinner" or "masher" thing there are several different gear setups for this as well.

M, the only reason I answered the original poster as I did is because I am a firm believer in process. Start at A and run through the steps. What you wrote above is exactly the same thing. And A in any instance is to first determine how fast that motor can turn.

Thanks for writing what ya did. Its not sexy or cutting edge or in need of a thousand different math formulas but it does have a great thing going for it.

It works practically every time.

Hope you and your family are having a great holiday!
thebondtrader55
QUOTE (donmoore @ May 23 2014, 03:12 PM) *
"My daughter should be on 155s, but I have 135s, 140s and 166. She has a 24" inseam. She's 6 going on 7. Gear ratio 38/17. SHe has one more win as a novice to move up, but she's all but guaranteed to move up, which means usually racing against intermediate boys.

Do I run the 140s or the 166s? She's been choppy on the 166s, but only when she's tired. She can also go up a bit in gear ratio, too, as she spins out on most tracks this season. So maybe I try the gear ratio change first, then see what's what.

Thoughts?"

Hey, this question is about as straight forward and honest as they come. A true question from a Dad with a 6 year old novice, soon to be advancing to the girl class, asking for advice on crank length and gearing. If there is any problem with this thread its all of us with some years of experience twisting our answers to emphases our own agenda which hardly relates to the dad's question.

Don, I think you and I completely agree on more of this than you may realize.

We probably won't ever agree on the fast feet thing but thats OK.

What you wrote about the big gears is right. After all if you want to compete in BMX and you're not a spinner with fast feet then what do ya do? And you are completely right that there have been riders with slow feet who have won. This isn't the optimum because if the big gears ever stop in a race they are almost impossible to restart. The little gears are much easier to get on and off the power.

So if you're not a spinner what to do? The only thing to do is what you described above. Get as insanely strong as you can and do it through gear multiplication.

And you are correct that it has been done at the highest levels - not very often but it has been done.

Hope you're having a fine holiday!
donmoore
Thanks bondtrader
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