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cruiser247
Standard cruisers seem to have quite a following...along with a BB that is higher than most...Is part of the reason for their popularity the difference in handling the higher BB offers?

The reason I ask is that I've been experimenting with one of the newer freestyle 24s (with a much higher BB) and now find my race cruiser (with the regular 12" BB) a little sluggish in comparison.

Does it make that much of a difference? And how does the higher BB work in a race situation? Or perhaps, to those that have ridden the lower BB frames and the higher BB frames...which do you prefer?
D-C
I have a custom standard with a lower BB......but to answer your question, lower bb feels better out of the gate. Of course.....opinions will vary
Bmx Prof
I think standards have a big following despite the higher BB.

Generally speaking BB height will positively impact the ease of lifting the front wheel for manualing. That said, it will negatively impact gate starts. Again... this is very basic and general but should help.
tsmith9233
Pardon my ignorance, how will a higher BB have negative effect on gates? And it will make manualing and lifting front wheel easier? Is this just for big wheels or 20's too?
Thanks
Bill Curtin
QUOTE (Bmx Prof @ Jul 17 2012, 05:58 AM) *
I think standards have a big following despite the higher BB.

Generally speaking BB height will positively impact the ease of lifting the front wheel for manualing. That said, it will negatively impact gate starts. Again... this is very basic and general but should help.


My take on this topic

The chain stay length is the factor in lifting of the rear wheel not the height of the bottom bracket. The fulcrum being the rear axle and the further your mass is located from that fulcrum, the more difficult it is to lift the mass(you, the rider). Perhaps a higher bottom bracket might increase the chain stay length. Any change that will lengthen or shorten the distance between the rear axle and the center of the riders mass will affect the ability to lift the front end.

A rider in a manual has that mass as far over over the rear wheel as possible to make the front of the bike easier to lift, whereas the rider snapping forward will help lessen the lift of the front wheel when torque is applied to rear wheel from an explosive burst in a start.

There, my moment of clarity has passed.
bystickel
The higher the BB, the higher the rider CG. When initiating a manual, that higher-located mass has a greater 'lever', making it a little easier to manual. It's an attempt to reduce the negative effects of long chainstays. A better solution (for most riders)would be to make short stays and keep a low BB.
CowhieDesigns
QUOTE (bystickel @ Jul 18 2012, 02:09 AM) *
The higher the BB, the higher the rider CG. When initiating a manual, that higher-located mass has a greater 'lever', making it a little easier to manual. It's an attempt to reduce the negative effects of long chainstays. A better solution (for most riders)would be to make short stays and keep a low BB.


This.....and a higher BB has a negative CG effect for most taller riders forcing the rider to be "on top of the bike" and not "in the bike"....meaning part of it. BMX handling is body position although some tall riders did prefer a higher BB, ala John Purse. Bubba lowered the BB for his sig. And I believe those guys were close to the same human height.
Works for me. Not a fan of high BB's.
cornfed
Not a fan of high BB here... it does give better pedal clearance and ass clearance. You have to run you bars taller to compensate too. I like 'em low
blowinmud
I switched this year from a Redline to a Standard. I am struggling with the higher bottom bracket. I feel like I am way up in the air and that I tower over the bike. The lower bottom bracket made me more like I was part of the bike not just on top of it.
Weaver
QUOTE (Bill Curtin @ Jul 17 2012, 01:11 PM) *
My take on this topic

The chain stay length is the factor in lifting of the rear wheel not the height of the bottom bracket. The fulcrum being the rear axle and the further your mass is located from that fulcrum, the more difficult it is to lift the mass(you, the rider). Perhaps a higher bottom bracket might increase the chain stay length. Any change that will lengthen or shorten the distance between the rear axle and the center of the riders mass will affect the ability to lift the front end.

A rider in a manual has that mass as far over over the rear wheel as possible to make the front of the bike easier to lift, whereas the rider snapping forward will help lessen the lift of the front wheel when torque is applied to rear wheel from an explosive burst in a start.

There, my moment of clarity has passed.


bb height and chainstay length both... reference JBradfords custom GT's with uber low bb to work with the chainstay lengths he was running
Bmx Prof
QUOTE (Weaver @ Jul 19 2012, 05:16 PM) *
bb height and chainstay length both... reference JBradfords custom GT's with uber low bb to work with the chainstay lengths he was running



I just looked at that bike the other day. The GT Pro model has like a 10.8 inch BB height... That is crazy low in comparison to the others.
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