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Bob D
[b]Coming from the racing forum:[/b]

I'm going to try and avoid hi-jacking this thread...was only trying to post more video exposure of pros, training, etc.

As for your question, I would assume you know why to accommodate resistance having it explained by Louie Simmons? I was not aware that he was actually using bands and chains that long ago (15-16 years). The answers for BMX training are many; too many to list here. I welcome you over to the training section for more details. Some simple answers are bands create an over-speed effect, much like a downhill sprint. Same with chains, but also add other values such as major core work due to the instability and unpredictable movements.

I can tell you many top pros are accommodating resistance (i.e. bands) in their gym training now a days.

As for Louie, he now does a lot work with speed related athletes, such as sprinters, NFL players/coaches. He has even has been to my gym to "certify" it and helped me personally, 1-on-1, to create BMX training.
me_louie.jpg ( 3.36K ) Number of downloads: 2


Hope this helps, and hope to see you in the training section of Vintage.



Thanks Big Bird for the invite. Let me introduce myself, my name is Bob Delamare, my first full powerlifting meet was in 1991. A hip injury kept me from doing heavy legs, so I switched to just bench meets. I competed in USPF bench meets until 2003, not a heavily "equipment assisted" federation. Switched to BMX racing, a little, in 2002, then full time in 2003, when my rotator cuffs would not let me continue benching heavy.
We have been using chains, boards, weight release devices, and bands at my gym for a long time, way before it became "trendy". Bought my first complete set of bands from "Jump-Stretch", 1998. After reading about them in PowerLifting USA. Our first set of heavy chains were found on the side of the highway. We used them to imitate the bench shirt or squat suit. Where the equipment takes the load at the bottom, the chains or bands would unload at the bottom and become harder at the top. Simulating the powerlifting equipment. I have always used them, but I am now training a top level amateur BMXer, he came to do legs last week, and I had it all set to go with the bands. He hated it and we ended up not using them.... I figured if this guy had never used them and won the NBL grands, "what the hell do I know!?" So we did a basic heavy leg routine, and had some great results, (don't ever do plyo's with a guy 75lbs lighter than you, he'll make you look stupid!).
Then yesterday, I watched your video of dR squatting with chains and other BMXers using the bamboo bar with bands and kettle bells. It just looked like a pre contest powerlifting routine, I was wondering how training for a 1 rep equipment assited max, could possibly help you get a 19 pound bike around the track faster? I am not trying to start crap, or an argument, I am just curious. I have been told by some of the local fast guys that I don't need to train that hard for BMX. I disagreed, I am changing from offseason training to race mode training now, I race a lot locally, sometimes 3-4 times a week, and don't hit many Nationals.
After reading one of Big Bird's posts, I did squat, what I consider, heavy this winter for the first time in a long time. Living in the North East I have no way of knowing if it helped yet or not, to be continued....
Thanks
Big Bird
[quote name='Bob D' date='Mar 14 2012, 01:34 PM' post='1162770']
[b]Coming from the racing forum:[/b]

I'm going to try and avoid hi-jacking this thread...was only trying to post more video exposure of pros, training, etc.

As for your question, I would assume you know why to accommodate resistance having it explained by Louie Simmons? I was not aware that he was actually using bands and chains that long ago (15-16 years). The answers for BMX training are many; too many to list here. I welcome you over to the training section for more details. Some simple answers are bands create an over-speed effect, much like a downhill sprint. Same with chains, but also add other values such as major core work due to the instability and unpredictable movements.

I can tell you many top pros are accommodating resistance (i.e. bands) in their gym training now a days.

As for Louie, he now does a lot work with speed related athletes, such as sprinters, NFL players/coaches. He has even has been to my gym to "certify" it and helped me personally, 1-on-1, to create BMX training.
me_louie.jpg ( 3.36K ) Number of downloads: 2


Hope this helps, and hope to see you in the training section of Vintage.



Thanks Big Bird for the invite. Let me introduce myself, my name is Bob Delamare, my first full powerlifting meet was in 1991. A hip injury kept me from doing heavy legs, so I switched to just bench meets. I competed in USPF bench meets until 2003, not a heavily "equipment assisted" federation. Switched to BMX racing, a little, in 2002, then full time in 2003, when my rotator cuffs would not let me continue benching heavy.
We have been using chains, boards, weight release devices, and bands at my gym for a long time, way before it became "trendy". Bought my first complete set of bands from "Jump-Stretch", 1998. After reading about them in PowerLifting USA. Our first set of heavy chains were found on the side of the highway. We used them to imitate the bench shirt or squat suit. Where the equipment takes the load at the bottom, the chains or bands would unload at the bottom and become harder at the top. Simulating the powerlifting equipment. I have always used them, but I am now training a top level amateur BMXer, he came to do legs last week, and I had it all set to go with the bands. He hated it and we ended up not using them.... I figured if this guy had never used them and won the NBL grands, "what the hell do I know!?" So we did a basic heavy leg routine, and had some great results, (don't ever do plyo's with a guy 75lbs lighter than you, he'll make you look stupid!).
Then yesterday, I watched your video of dR squatting with chains and other BMXers using the bamboo bar with bands and kettle bells. It just looked like a pre contest powerlifting routine, I was wondering how training for a 1 rep equipment assited max, could possibly help you get a 19 pound bike around the track faster? I am not trying to start crap, or an argument, I am just curious. I have been told by some of the local fast guys that I don't need to train that hard for BMX. I disagreed, I am changing from offseason training to race mode training now, I race a lot locally, sometimes 3-4 times a week, and don't hit many Nationals.
After reading one of Big Bird's posts, I did squat, what I consider, heavy this winter for the first time in a long time. Living in the North East I have no way of knowing if it helped yet or not, to be continued....
Thanks
[/quote]

Bob, thanks for the reply and welcome to the training section. I was skeptical that lifting heavy would hinder bmx performance too, but the fact is, ONLY lifting heavy won't really do anything for BMX, but maybe make your first few pedals out of the gate stronger (but necessarily faster). Besides getting faster, the key really is to become more powerful. In my opinion, BMX is similar to MMA (i.e. UFC). You need to be strong, fast, but your key elements are your skills....and a well rounded fighter possesses all of these qualities, as does a well rounded BMXer.

Now, let's take a few more scenarios such as a novice rider: rides choppy, leans over the bars & technique is obviously lacking. Not only is this a skill issue, but it's also an indicator of several weaknesses too. Now take the opposite...a very skilled and talented rider, who is national main-maker and has NEVER been in the gym. I got money that kid who can race at the national level and has never been in the gym has some serious horsepower under the hood - and with the proper technique/supervision, has an impressive squat. They can do plyos better than their high school peers on the starting basketball team. Racing and (the proper) weight training really do compliment each other.

Also, take that novice rider who leans way over his bars while chopping carrot sticks, and you will see the same issues if you ask them to do a (safe, low weight) squat or deadlift; leans forward, rounded back, etc.

Next, go pull up youtube and watch a typical race. During your average 35 second race, you will see an average of 12-15 seconds pedaling. What is a rider doing for the other 20 seconds??? It's all these funky motions that resemble squatting, deadlifting, good-mornings, power-cleans, plyometrics, etc. Besides increasing your skills, how should you train for that other 20 seconds?

I'm not even going to get into the body-building routines that so many BMXers get sucked into doing, but squatting is typically associated with going heavy. Again, heavy is only a portion of what you should do. More importantly, you should be doing it explosively....like an Olympic lift. How does an individual do that? Drop your 1RM squat to approx 40-50% and do several sets of explosive low reps (resembles hitting 2nd straight, doesn't it?) Now the video may make a little more sense. As for the bench with bamboo/kettlebells...turn those guys upright/horizontal...now it resembles them holding the handlebars - that particular movement helps with upper body stability issues like hitting ruts, bonking, pack riding, etc.

Now I will address the accommodating resistance (chains & bands). For BMX, as mentioned, moving weight explosively (like a power clean) is more beneficial than a heavy lift. Bands do several things besides incorporate more resistance, which I will name a few:
- BMX is primarily concentric movements. Bands deload the eccentric phases of a lift (which causes a lot of soreness/DOMS) and rapidly upload the concentric movements
- Bands increases the neuromuscular activity more than just straight bar weight by adding resistance with the ability to still move it explosively, adding the programming the CNS to be faster & stronger (more powerful).
- Bands have the ability to force the body into being faster, more powerful - as proven with Tendo Unit
- Although chains do not have the stretch reflex bands do, they are similar in the uploading/deloading, and provide a different stimulus of more core work due to unpredictable/inconsistent movements (i.e. swaying).
- Due to the significant uploading effects of both chains & bands, the body is "encouraged" to increase it's rate of force to maintain technique & speed. Try moving 200 lbs of band tension slow to see what happens.
- By accommodating resistance such as chains and/or bands, you introduce a new stimulus to the body, making it virtually impossible to plateau.

I will end with this...

Let's say you have 2 nearly identical riders. Very good technique/skills and whomever has the inside gate always determines who comes out of the 1st turn on top. How would you break this to give 1 rider the consistent edge? What if you put a few more horsepower under the hood?


Bob D
Now that is what I call information! I'm going to keep doing the bands and chains. It makes more sense now!
Thanks
s4lnj
one of bb best qualities is his ability to explain things clearlly.

back in about 2000 i was working in a body shop and the boss had sent me to the metal yard to buy a truckload of the heaviest chains they had, i assumed it was for pulling frames, wrong. his son had just got into a D1 school playing football and he said that they were using the chains in thier lifting program. he didn't know why. but he said there must be a good reason for it. lol.
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