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Who wants to learn to polish?
Paul Springer
post Nov 27 2006, 09:12 PM
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Ted, your one nutty cat with some mad polishing skillz. Very impressive stuff and I look forward to following this thread. More importantly I am glad your local so I can just drop my stuff off and pick it up next day (j/k). Keep up the good work brutha...
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Kurt.
post Nov 28 2006, 01:14 AM
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Ted - You are a resto genius. As if Oxalic acid wasn't enough on steel restoration, now you want to revolutionise restoration of alloy. Good on you mate!
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1niceharo
post Nov 28 2006, 01:48 PM
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nicely done .. ive been using the dremel forever now and works great. The polishing wheels are a bit pricey but worth it. I use mothers polish and works great. The bling part is the best but a little more time and effort to do if you want results like this. You guys will enjoy the second class im sure.

here is 3 days worth of hand rubbing sanding and polishing! and thats just the stem
(IMG:http://img529.imageshack.us/img529/6999/hutchstemtr9.jpg)
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Guest_t nile_*
post Nov 28 2006, 04:16 PM
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I think Ted deserves the term "Resto Guru" or something of the like by his name.
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rimspoke2
post Nov 30 2006, 12:23 PM
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agreed. Thanks for this and all you write ups Ted.
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MikeStevens
post Nov 30 2006, 02:17 PM
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Ted,

It is awesome that you are writing all of this up. This is exactly what these boards should be for. And I cant wait for the upper level classes.
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OZZYBMX
post Dec 1 2006, 05:54 AM
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Ted is the master of BMX HOW TO !
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OZZYBMX
post Dec 1 2006, 06:02 AM
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better still , there should be a READ ONLY TOPIC with tried and tested HOW TO topics on it so people can go there and read the way to do things .

like this thread , removing anodizing , removing rust from chrome ..ect...

we'll call it TEDS THREAD
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mdurg
post Dec 1 2006, 06:35 PM
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Way cool! Thanks Ted!

I just got some cheap 7X's today that are kind of beat. They will be my sacrifice to the aluminum gods. I've only got a battery powered black n decker dremel, but I do have a mouse sander. The mouse sucks for woodworking I'm glad it will have a use now :-)
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Ted Carl
post Dec 2 2006, 05:26 AM
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OK Guys......Who wants to change the pace?

Polishing 102. Mixed abrasive and non-abrasive polishing.

Today I am going to prep a bolt to fix my pro neck on my blue Sting that Pauly broke, and now won't let me hear the end of.

Okie dokie. New metal.

18-8 Stainless Steel.

This is a hardware store 18-8 bolt that I have drilled for a Pro-Neck (Drilling it is not a part of this class.). Who here thinks it looks like poo-poo? Everyone? Good. Me too!

(IMG:http://img182.imageshack.us/img182/2351/boltorigtopwsxog0.jpg)

Abrasive polishing is just as it sounds. You use abrasives to polish. It is not very technical, it just takes some practice and some know how, and a few tools and compounds.

It is based on using coarser abrasives and progressing to finer abrasives. Simple. However, If you think that you need to spend hours going from grit, to grit, to grit, to achieve a polish on a very hard stainless steel surface, you are about to be proven wrong.

The big deal in this lesson, is going to be the standard from here on out. When using abrasives, the whole trick to a good finish is "Keeping things straight". Flat, Smooth, and Straight! We never want a distorted reflection! A good mirror is a flat mirror!!!!

Step one will be to sand the part smooth with a belt sander and (somewhat worn) 80 grit paper/belt. First sand the top like this. Rotate the part and understand that as you sand it down it grips the belt better, and tires harder to depart from your grip. It also tries to rotate. You must keep it flat, and try to distribute the sanding pressure evenly. ROTATE the part a few times as you work.

(IMG:http://img86.imageshack.us/img86/7075/sandingtopwsxfy0.jpg)

Then do the sides. The bolt has a convenient handle to hold it with. Lay it on flat, use both hands to steady it and don't let the sanding angle change from laying flat. Keep the flats nice and square.

(IMG:http://img166.imageshack.us/img166/5949/sandingsidewsxit3.jpg)

When you are done sanding there should be only one nice flat surface on each side, and the surface should have a texture like this.
(IMG:http://img87.imageshack.us/img87/2576/sandedtopbestwsxky2.jpg)

Now for the next tool on the list.

A 3M Scotch-brite wheel grade 8A or so, and a high speed grinder to turn it. As you will see this is priceless for polishing. The wheel will probably cost more than the grinder. They last a long tme and save hours of work. They are hard, but soft..., fuzzy but gritty... Choose a grinder that turns the wheel at 3450 RPM. It works faster and smoother.

The same rules apply to these wheels as others. Notable rotate the part WITH the direction of rotation.

Rotate the part to get the edges like this.
(IMG:http://img242.imageshack.us/img242/3153/3mwheelanglewsxzf8.jpg)

The top is easy to keep flat, just spin it in circles.

The sides are the trick to keep straight. Simply hold the parts with the flats straight up. Move your hands in a circular motion, about one round per second. The wheel only touches the part at the 90 degree point. When you near the top and bottom edges of your part, as you are moving it in a vertical circle, you will hear the change in the sound of the wheel fuzz nipping at the edges. Just keep the circle the size that makes that sound on the top and bottom. This will remove all the big scratches from the 80 grit belt sanding.
(IMG:http://img157.imageshack.us/img157/8453/3mwheelwsxmj7.jpg)

[ December 02, 2006, 06:33 AM: Message edited by: Ted Carl ]
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