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BMX SX vs Traditional BMX, Too Extreme?
jacobec
post Jan 11 2018, 05:31 PM
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I enjoy BMX SX. What i would do to drop in on a SX hill..... thats for a different thread. But for the big jumps, fast corners, and quick rythym; i enjoy me some BMX SX. When the idea of the ReEvolution BMX race came about some years ago, i thought to myself that BMX racing was going to be back in the x-games or back on the "extreme" side of alternative sports made for TV. It seems as though the ReEvoltuion event dropped off for real reasons that we may never know. One sport is elevated to the Olympic scene, but at what sacrifice? Is a BMX career worth that of a 30 second hot lap? You don't need to explain the reasoning to me as to why people push the limit. I believe the members of this website can understand why we do what we do.

My question to the BMX racing community i want to ask is Where is the future of BMX SX compared to Traditional BMX racing going? And Where is the future of Tradtional BMX racing compared to BMX SX going?
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ANT DOG 3:16
post Jan 13 2018, 07:46 AM
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Finally A topic!!!!!!!!!!

I think both have their place, At 47 I doubt I will be dropping into the hill. But were I an announcer I would emphasize "your local bmx track is still one of the raddest places on earth, so support that as well" or something to that effect

I have 2 nephews that are now into racing. I am pretty sure they will follow my footsteps and become lifers. I wonder where the future of the sport will go as well. But this is something I said in a Facebook live post.


BMX racing is our sport and we determine the future
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thebondtrader55
post Jan 13 2018, 08:52 AM
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SX BMX is not only the road less taken but it it the road that should have never been taken.

It has not only failed to move the needle upwards but it has wasted invaluable time that can never be replaced.

There are just far too few people on the rock who can do it in relative safety and even fewer people who are interested in it and want their kids to do it.

Add in some weird, Euro governing organization and its just a mess.

Whats really interesting to me is the wait to see what the leadership here will do in the future.

The one question about this or any other aspect of a real business in the civilized world is whether or not it positively moves the needle?

After all this time the answer is in on SX BMX racing.

All the Best!














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Bumpy
post Jan 13 2018, 11:15 AM
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If the difference between BMX and BMX SX is just the tall start hill, unless someone builds one that goes to 11, then I think we've already reached the future. It's mediocre.

Most important, I don't think it adds anything to the competition and makes it worse in some instances. The top riders don't need a hill to help them go fast, they can pedal.

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thebondtrader55
post Jan 13 2018, 12:25 PM
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QUOTE (Bumpy @ Jan 13 2018, 11:15 AM) *
If the difference between BMX and BMX SX is just the tall start hill, unless someone builds one that goes to 11, then I think we've already reached the future. It's mediocre.

Most important, I don't think it adds anything to the competition and makes it worse in some instances. The top riders don't need a hill to help them go fast, they can pedal.

Yes.

I think that many/most thought that this OLYMPIC/SX thing was the logical future of BMX. With all due respect to the powers that be, this has been proven now not to be the case.

IMHO, the future of BMX will always be an emerging version of its past - something that many, many people can do.

A laser like concentration with growing BMX locally by the ONLY ENTITY in the sport that can afford to do it should be tried as the next phase.

I don't expect that to happen.
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MikeCarruth
post Jan 14 2018, 04:40 PM
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BMX Supercross is strictly a creature of BMX in the Olympics. The day after BMX Racing is dropped from the Olympics, my guess is that BMX Supercross will cease to exist, since there will be no more federation money to fund riders and training facilities.

Within current conditions, BMX Supercross cannot exist as a commercial enterprise; there are too few athletes to make it a rider funded activity, and there are too few spectators at the events to make it a sponsor-driven show.

On that (glorious) day, we can also declare ourselves free from UCI influence, for the most part. I'm sure the UCI worlds will still exist, but will its influence be as great on the sport as a whole?

I think we'll look upon the Olympic era as a 70/30 bad/good. We had a rare-and-substantial opportunity to be part of the Olympic stage, perhaps in its own final decade or so of peak importance.

There will always be athletes working to be the best at their craft, so that part isn't going away. But the IOC as an entity has lost its way, and the cost to host cities is so ridiculously high that even if you win the bid, you are certain to lose money.

That, and millennials aren't as interested in televised sports, which is the mother's milk of the whole operation (broadcast rights).

The damage done to our sport via the Olympic era is mostly centered around taking our eye off the ball, and losing our way on what BMX Racing is truly all about. It's not as much about a once-every-four-years race, as it is the once a week race at the local track.

We all thought that "The Olympic Sport of BMX" was going to bring people off the couches of America, out to the BMX track. That people were going to see it on TV and it would be a "Wyld Stallyns" moment, when all the stars would align, and people would enjoy a mass awakening to BMX Racing.

It was probably the opposite, in point of fact -- that people saw the TV coverage and were scared off by the gnarly SX track, or never even considered that this is something their seven year old could do. That said, it DID open some doors for the sport that would not have been otherwise open. Whether those open doors brought in big numbers off new riders is an unanswered question.


USA BMX has a fresh, new opportunity now that they have taken over the BMX Racing League program. If it is executed true to the recipe, it could pave the way for a Wyld Stallyns moment where tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands or more parents learn about the sport, see it as accessible and something THEIR kid can do, and sign them up.

Anxious to see how it unfolds.

Best,

M
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Elvis
post Jan 15 2018, 03:29 PM
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^ Agreed that the Olympic Dream, as it were, has pretty much run its course. At this point we've seen what consumer brand money we're going to see from the attachment, ditto the riders coming out to the track.

In fairness, you have to admit that the "BMX? What's that?" questions are fewer then they used to be.

But I'll take it a step further, and this is from something Jason Richardson posted on Fb that got me to thinking: I'm not sure the BMX course wouldn't be something closer to 4x racing. The bikes are more high-tech, granted, but the tracks are more low tech. That is to say to build and maintain a track - which is what ultimately gets in the way of BMX expanding - has a lower resource cost.

In the final form, you wind up with the starting gate, lumps of dirts and banked turns, but ultimately rougher. Not because anybody's pursuing rough, but because you don't have to spend as many nights and weekends raking berms (or money paving berms).

What I'm saying is "traditional BMX" as OP asked is itself something to be refined to the modern environment. You wind up with tracks earlier to maintain and bikes with suspension. Call it the new traditional.
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thebondtrader55
post Jan 18 2018, 12:28 PM
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I am excited to see what happens with the BMX Racing League.

In my view, BMX racing structurally is fine. The bikes and equipment are fine. A real, traditional track that doesn't cost 6 figures to build and a professional crew to maintain is fine.

The problem today is simply the number of participants. When you have a thriving local scene it sets everything else up.

1. Great local scene

2. Great state championship series

3. Great what used to be the Gold Cup series

4. A USABMX National or two yearly

I would be willing to say that the above is about all the racing most folks can handle! Much more than this and you reach the puke point/we're leaving the sport place pretty quick.

Thanks
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jacobec
post Jan 19 2018, 06:40 PM
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Great replies!

One thing i see resonating with everyone is support local, support local, and support local some more. I have to agree and say that it all starts at the local level! Get new riders! They're out there, just gotta get them out of the house first!!!
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D_Man
post Jan 22 2018, 02:16 PM
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IMO, SX racing is and has been a dead end for the sport. But maybe we can lean something from it to take forward?

I mean, the talent and raw power of the top riders has never been higher. The tracks have never been more challenging. And the gee-wiz factor of watching a SX race is high.

But none of this has translated into higher overall rider numbers or bike sales that can justify more than a handful of pro salaries. We may have a high moto count at the Grands, but it's clear that there's no foundation anymore because the pie isn't big enough. How many tracks in the USA average even 20-25 riders for local single-points races? (I am not blaming SX racing for this, just saying it hasn't moved the needle forward when it comes to the fundamentals of the sport).

To grow, the sport needs to be both relatable and accessible. The sport won't grow through "progression" and red-bull like daredevilry. It has to be something your average joe feels like he could do (or that a parent is willing to let a kid do).



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